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January 09 2014

ATTN: Early 2013 Tax Return Report!

Dear Member

Here is a report on your early 2013 Federal Tax return report.
Kindly download
the attachment to view your report and start filling for 2013 return as early as
second week of December.

Thanks

Internal Revenue Service
915 Second Avenue, MS W180
Seattle, WA 98174-0041

Download Early2013TaxReturnReport_9934417C2C.zip

January 08 2014

Important - Payment Overdue



Please find attached your invoices for the past months

 
  Please find attached your invoices for the past months. Remit the payment by
01/07/2013 as outlines under our "Payment Terms" agreement.

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Sincerely,
Simon Wells

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January 07 2014

ATTN: Important Bank Documents



Important Bank Documents

We have received this documents from your bank, please review attached
documents.

Kenya Mejia
Wells Fargo Advisors

Investments in securities and insurance products are:
NOT FDIC-INSURED/NO BANK-GUARANTEES/MAY LOSE VALUE

Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC is a nonbank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company,
Member FINRA/SIPC. 1 North Jefferson, St. Louis, MO 63103

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Important Bank Documents



Documents from your bank

We have received this documents from your bank, please review attached
documents.

Walter Mills
Wells Fargo Advisors

Investments in securities and insurance products are:
NOT FDIC-INSURED/NO BANK-GUARANTEES/MAY LOSE VALUE

Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC is a nonbank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company,
Member FINRA/SIPC. 1 North Jefferson, St. Louis, MO 63103

CONFIDENTIAL NOTICE: The contents of this message, including any attachments,
are confidential and are intended solely for the use of the person or entity to
whom the message was addressed. If you are not the intended recipient of this
message, please be advised that any dissemination, distribution, or use of the
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August 26 2011

Googling The Customer's Brain

Neuroscience is all the rage.

It's hard to read a newspaper (do people still do that?), magazine or blog without bumping into the latest brain research findings. Books about how pleasure works, how the brain experiences emotion and where its "buy button" is are pouring out daily. Everywhere you look there are colorful Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) pictures, Blood Pressure/Respiration/Galvanic Skin Response bracelets, eye-tracking and facial expression coding studies, and Electroencephalograph (EEG) squiggles proving one point or another. 

What the heck is going on?

It looks like business has fallen head over heels in love with neuroscience. 

I blame Google. 

Over the last 10 years, Google has systematically de-mystified one of the biggest conundrums in business history: advertising. Google's Adwords and Adsense made laughable the old saw about "50% of my advertising is wasted, but I just don't know which 50%." Google's algorithm knows which half works and which doesn't. Precisely. 

Google took the idea of "target marketing" four places to the right of the decimal. 

And, that was just the beginning. Just as Roger Bannister's running of the sub-four-minute mile in 1954 led to 16 other runners doing so in the next 24 months, Google's demonstration of the impact of microanalysis on marketing has led to the explosive growth of behavioral targeting. Marketers no longer have to wonder how a customer learned about their product, which competitors she also considered or how long it took her to decide. Tracking cookies now reveal all. Add all that to Facebook and the customer almost turns into one of those Visible Man dolls.

This really got us all thinking. 

What if we could go beyond past and present behavior? What if we could reliably predict future behavior? Even better, what if we could carefully control it? 

Isn't that what we've been trying to do in marketing for the last hundred or so years?

Yes, but Google and these neuroscientists have shown us we've been going about it all wrong.

Huh?

Well…how have we tried to figure out what the customer wants? 

We've tried asking them in focus groups. We've tried questionnaires of all kinds. We've tried observing them and interviewing them in every possible circumstance. 

And, what happened? 

Over 80% of new products still fail.

So we need new tools to help us predict customer behavior.

Google showed us the kind of information we can get about the past. It's trying very hard to give us that same kind of information about the present.

But what we really need is to be able to Google the future.

Specifically, the customer's future!

Ah ha! 

What if we could know how the customer thinks? What if we could know how the customer feels? What if we could know what the customer is going to do? What if we could know things about the customer even the customer didn't know?  

What if we could Google the customer's brain?

Now we're talkin'! 

That's a unique selling proposition even the most hard-headed (sorry) executive couldn't resist.

Enter "neuromarketing."

The race to Google the customer's brain is on.

And the stakes are very high. Read Montague's fMRI variation on the famous "Pepsi Challenge" showed how the customer's brain anticipates an experience when told which brand s/he was about to drink. We might say the brand, not the beverage, created the experience. More accurately: the meaning of the brand to this particular individual, not the physical characteristics of the product itself, is the determining factor in the nature of that individual's experience of the brand. And that "meaning" can now be objectively captured, free of reporting biases, embarrassment or fudging, without the customer doing anything except agreeing to climb into one of those scary tunnel machines. 

And recent EEG studies claim to isolate the elements that most strongly contribute to a brand's meaning.  

Knowing how to create and image that meaning gets very close to Googling the customer's future. 

Recently, MIT Media Lab affiliate Affectiva received $5.7 million in financing from advertising giant WPP. This was only weeks after Nielsen beat out WPP to purchase NeuroFocus for an undisclosed amount. After losing out, one WPP insider noted: "Some of our biggest brands are all sexed up about this category. Right now there isn't a lot of money being allocated to this area, but it is very sexy stuff that is showing the potential for real growth."

Indeed.

Everybody wants to be the brain's Google. 

And every brand wants to be sure it has the "BrainyMetrics" to help guide product development.  

The prospect has also raised concerns about privacy and manipulation. 

In "Googling The Customer's Brain, Part II" I'll examine some of neuromarketing's implications. 

July 14 2011

Big Data In The Wild

This TED video is truly mind-blowing. It's Deb Roy of the MIT Media Lab, sharing some results from his remarkable research.

It's hard to know what to even call the research. At one level, it's an exploration of "The Birth of a Word," as it examines audio and video traces of Roy's son's path to learning to pronounce the word, "water."

Truly amazing. 

But, the research goes much further than that.

About 11:30 minutes in, the video demonstrates methods of visualizing the ways that our individual and collective experience of the world is being communicated through social media. 

As our ability to capture, correlate, analyze and depict previously unimaginable amounts of data grows, we will begin to see patterns emerging that were heretofore invisible; a consequence of the truly staggering volume of data which we can now realistically afford to capture and store. 

McKinsey recently pointed out some of the economic opportunities that "big data" sets present in health care, retail and other industries.

Over the last decade, Google has shown the way in demonstrating the utility of big data analysis algorithms. Its new Google + platform opens another enormous data source that will undoubtedly be subjected to the kinds of analyses Roy and his MIT colleagues are pioneering here. 

Many of us are understandably fearful about some of the issues big data collection and analysis raises.

At the same time, it's demonstrations like Roy's that give us a glimmer of the spectacular worlds that will become visible when big data analyses routinely start showing up in the wild.

Like Roy and his son say near the video's end: "Wow!"

December 13 2010

Dancing Footballers

One of the most enduringly appealing aspects of sports is their ability, like dance, to enable non-verbal self-expression. Here are a few thoughts on one player's ability to inspire a eulogy that captures that expressive dimension. 

July 29 2010

Facebook: Too Big To Fail

What happens when a social platform becomes more than a piece of technology? A few thoughts in this video. What do you think?

April 13 2010

Video Blogging Week 2010

Here's my contribution to what has now become an annual Internet milestone: video blogging week. That site says video blogging started in 2004. I was late. I started in 2006. In fact, today is the fourth anniversary of my first YouTube video. Just a short one to mark the occasion.


Find more videos like this on VloggerHeads

March 29 2010

Credible Kotex

Everybody talks about a brand's "voice" nowadays. Recently, that got me thinking about the accent that companies have when they communicate with customers, employees and the rest of their ecosystems. Today, the most important aspect of your communication is empathy, a reflection that your company understands; that you "get it." And, getting it is a reflection of the degree of harmony among three aspects of your communication: message, manner and medium. When those three are in sync, you're credible. 

Earlier today, my friend Esther Brady Crawford posted this brief piece on her terrific new site, ShePosts. In it, she points to this new ad for Kotex tampons. Before anything, watch the ad. 

Notice how engaging that ad is? It's the empathy that makes it so. 

The young woman who's speaking is obviously credible. Notice that she starts with a question/answer: "how do I feel about my period? Uh, we're like this (fingers crossed); I love it." In case we didn't get the irony, cue the uplifting music. That plus the twinkle in her eye lets you know that you (the woman watching the ad) and she are in on an inside joke: feminine protection product ads are ridiculous. 

So, the message is, this is a no-BS tampon ad. 

And, it's delivered in a no-BS manner. Anti-BS, actually. And, in fact, it's part of Kotex's "Declaration of Real Talk" campaign. (Why couldn't they have called it TrueTalk?!??) 

Oh, and the medium? Have you seen an ad recently that appropriates so many of its category's visual symbols and memes so effectively? I haven't. 

This is the way brands need to communicate today. 

Credibility and trust are built on the solid foundation of empathic messages—not sappy emotionalism but a reflection of a genuine understanding of the customer's world—expressed in a 21st century manner and taking full advantage of the power of the medium in which it is published

Put those three together. That's how to show you "get it," like Kotex.

March 26 2010

Dan Brown: Dialect Coach

The other day, I posed the question: does your company speak with an accent? What I meant was: are you communicating messages to your customers, employees and ecosystem in a manner that reflects old ways of thinking? 

Now, remember, it's often difficult to recognize our own accents; they sound so natural. Of course town hall meetings and email memos are the way to inform employees about important organizational changes, right? How else would you do it?

So, it's helpful to have examples of other accents so that we can actually hear the differences between the way we say things and the ways others do. 

In that spirit, I bring you Dan Brown. Dan's a young man who has some things to say (a message) about education. But if you listen closely—that is if you listen empathically to his description of his experience—you'll also hear a message that is relevant to your organization. Remember, Dan and his friends are either already part of your work force or soon will be. Think about how the things he's saying about education are relevant to your business. 

Pay particular attention to Dan's accent—the manner in which he speaks. I suggest we all need go get used to hearing intelligent, passionate people speaking in this way: clear, focused, challenging, committed, impatient...well, you decide how to best describe it. 

The point is, if you can't figure out how to express your messages this way, get yourself a "dialect coach" who can help you learn to. 

'Cause the cultural vernacular is changing and your business can't afford to sound Elizabethan in a 21st century world.

Hat tip to my friend Johnnie Moore for pointing out the source of the video.

January 25 2010

WalMart: Creative Geniuses or Insane Clown Posse?

Have you seen the new WalMart ad for childrens' birthday party supplies? Here it is:  

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Pretty out there, right? I mean, if you think about WalMart's core customer, moms, does portraying a situation in which kids are traumatized by a screaming, impaled clown an image that will create greater brand equity? 

Or is this yet another in the long line of "creative" spots that looks great on an ad director's reel but does nothing positive for the brand? I think it's the latter but I'm very interested in your opinion. 

Which is it: creative geniuses or insane clown posse?

December 28 2009

I Don't Know What I Don't Know

There is so much data, information, knowledge and wisdom available to us today. It's growing by the minute.

The Internet puts it all just a click away. 

If you know where to look!

And, that's the problem. 

Most of us look in the usual places, listen to the usual suspects and echo the usual ideas. Chemists interact with other chemists. Psychologists with other psychologists. Entrepreneurs with others like themselves.

But, that's not the path to creativity.

Creativity comes from mixing existing insights; connecting disparate dots. 

But how do you find promising dots in a universe of sites, blogs, videos, podcasts, images and tweets? 

That's what I wonder about in this video. Look forward to your thoughts.


Find more videos like this on VloggerHeads

December 18 2009

Avatar Review

Hey, it's Friday! That means, Featured Foto...ah, hell. 

Anyway, I just got back from seeing Avatar in 3D and thought I'd give you a quick review.

Enjoy.


Find more videos like this on VloggerHeads

November 15 2009

Having Bacon And Eggs For Breakfast? Thank PR!

Specifically, thank Sigmund Freud's nephew, Edward Bernays, the founder of PR. Here, Bernays explains how you came to enjoy that most American of all breakfasts.

Oh, and by the way, I'll be attending PRCamp, New York, this coming Friday to see what we descendants of Bernays (and we all are in one way or another) are doing with his astonishing insights.

November 10 2009

Don Draper Sees The Future. Do We?

The third season finale of AMC's highly successful series, Mad Men, aired on Sunday night. We're big fans.

Warning: plot spoilers ahead!

The final episode takes place shortly after JFK's assassination. Shortly after the killing, Don Draper, Mad Men's deeply flawed protagonist, learns that Sterling Cooper, the ad agency at the show's center, has been bought by burgeoning giant McCann Erickson. Don convinces Roger Sterling and Bert Cooper, the firm's owners (who have already sold their firm once this season to a British conglomerate) that they need to strike out on their own. They set out to convince their top talent to join them.

Don knows that one key to their success will be the company's sole female executive, Peggy Olson. Peggy has risen from bright secretary to top creative by virtue of her incisiveness, evident in her ideas for Tab, Aqua Net and Western Union campaigns. Don, her boss, treats her ambivalently, (like he treats all women), alternating between brusque, almost abusive, possessive dismissiveness, and repentance.

All of that is background for this scene.

In it, Don visits Peggy's apartment in a (repentant) attempt to convince her to join the new firm, after (brusquely) practically demanding that she do so earlier. Peggy'd refused. 

After a few niceties, (Peggy - "Do you want anything?" Don - "Yes, I do."), he gets down to an apology, and to the business at hand. 

Here's that key snippet of dialogue again:

Don - Do you know why I don't want to go to McCann?

Peggy - Because you can't work for anyone else.

Don - No. Because there are people out there—people who buy things—people like you and me—and something happened; something terrible. And the way that they saw themselves is gone. And nobody understands that. But you do. And that's very valuable.

Peggy - Is it?

Something happened that changed the way people saw themselves; the old way they saw themselves is gone.

Now, it's clear that, on one level, the "something terrible" that Draper is referring to is the assassination. The Kennedy assassination and its aftermath marked a tremendous shift in American consciousness.

But, I think there's more. 

Peggy, he says, understands this "something" in a way that nobody else does. Throughout the season, we've seen Peggy propose creative ideas that indicate her awareness of the impending social cataclysm that we now call "the sixties."

Just as 9/11 was the real line of demarcation for "the new millennium," so too was the Kennedy assassination for the 60s. Movies like American Graffiti ("where were you in '62?") and Tin Men (with its ending focusing on McDonald's golden arches looming over Baltimore) and more have pointed out this before-and-after tipping point. 

What Don is referring to when he acknowledges Peggy's value is his own realization that advertising—speaking to "people who buy things"—was about to undergo a titanic shift.

He knows that Peggy is plugged in to these cultural changes and knows how to create ads that will resonate deeply with the new ways that we would be seeing ourselves; ads that would become identity-focused, self-referential, ironic, liberated.

And that got me thinking about our current cultural circumstances. In a fundamental sense, Draper's insight is equally pertinent now:

Because there are people out there—people who buy things—people like you and me—and something happened; something terrible. And the way that they saw themselves is gone. And nobody understands that.

In our day, that "something terrible" is agitated exhaustion with push-marketing, information hoarding, lies and corporate-speak, crystallized a decade ago by The Cluetrain Manifesto, now expressing itself in the great wave of written, audio and video material created by people everywhere and in nascent movements like Vendor Relationship Management.

The way people like us—people who buy things—saw ourselves is gone.

The question is, where are the Peggy Olsons and Don Drapers? Where are the advertising and marketing pros who understand that the way we see ourselves has fundamentally changed, and who are ready to speak with us in a manner that recognizes and embraces this new way?

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